SARS first was identified in the Chinese province of Guangdong in 2002. In 2003, the World Health Organization informed the tourists of the outbreak of this disease and recommended “screening departing passengers between China, Hong Kong, Taiwan and the United States” (Lui, 2011:1).

The impact of SARS on the tourism sub-sector of transport was enormous. During the outbreak in China, thousands of tourists reduced their air travel. The research conducted by the American experts studied the severity and duration of this negative impact (Lui, 2011). It was found that different people had different reaction to the outbreak. The researchers divided public into active tourists and passive tourists. Mass media influenced the tourists’ behavior. Most travelers tried to find information about SARS prior their travel (Lui, 2011).

THE ROLE OF MACRO AND MICRO-ENVIRONMENTAL FACTORS AND THE SUB-SECTOR’S POSITION IN THE TOURISM SYSTEM TO HINDER THE SPREAD OF PANDEMIC

Such macro-environmental factors as social, political, cultural, economic factors influence the running of any business, including tourism. In our case, the World Health Organization issued special travel advisories to inform tourists of the pandemic in Asia (Viruses without Borders: International Aspects of SARS, 2011). Many cultural events in Hong Kong were delayed. Besides, it was found that SARS posed enormous psychological problems among the public (Experts Warn against SARS’ Psychological Impact on Asian Economy, 2003). Micro-environmental factors are closely connected with business and have direct impact on its strategy. They include not only customers, employees, suppliers, but also media. In our case, media played an important role during the outbreak as it informed the public of SARS consequences and preventive measures. Transport sector in the tourism system ceased its work to hinder the spread of pandemic in Hong Kong (Tourism Industry, 2004).

EVALUATION OF THE MAIN ASPECTS OF THE MICRO-ENVIRONMENT OF THE SUB-SECTOR AFFECTED BY THE PANDEMIC

The main aspects of the micro-environment that were affected by the pandemic include tourists or clients, and employees who work in transport sector. The tourists had no opportunity to get high quality services and the employees had no opportunity to perform their duties in a proper way because of the spread of SARS. The statistics showed that the income of personnel in Hong Kong including tour guides and drivers fall by 90% (Clark, 2003). Some employees were given advanced leave as their agencies had no clients.

DISCUSSION OF SOME MEASURES THAT COULD HELP TO DEAL WITH PANDEMIC OR MITIGATE ITS IMPACTS

As pandemic can be spread rather quickly, it is necessary to find appropriate measures that could help to deal with SARS or mitigate its negative impacts. First of all, each country should have effective reporting systems to inform public of the outbreak. Secondly, it is very important to enhance measures for disease screening as well as health related support at airports, railway stations and seaports (Viruses without Borders: International Aspects of SARS, 2011).

It was found that “many Asian countries announced financial aid to help soften the negative impacts of SARS” (The Economic Impact of SARS, 2003). For example, the government of Singapore announced to provide financial help to its tourism and transport factors, while in Malaysia’s banks it was announced to cut costs for corporate customers. Hong Kong developed a special “relief plan” that included tax breaks and loans to the victims of SARS and to disinfect their homes (The Economic Impact of SARS, 2003).

Taking the above mentioned information into consideration, it is necessary to develop effective strategy in order to mitigate pandemic’s impacts. The most effective method is to avoid work of transport sector during pandemic. Besides, it is better to close schools, universities, and to pay attention to crowded places, to supply population with special masks.

THE INTERNATIONAL DIMENSION OF THE PANDEMIC

It is known that SARS had been spread to 30 countries on five continents of the world just in several weeks after its outbreak in Hong Kong. In Canada, SARS was imported by travelers who came from Asia (Viruses without Borders: International Aspects of SARS, 2011). Besides Hong Kong, China and Canada, the pandemic was spread in Malaysia, Singapore, Philippines, Vietnam and some other countries.

CONCLUSION

In conclusion, it is necessary to say that different pandemics always have negative impact on the successful development of tourism industry. That is why it is necessary for the global tourism industry to apply appropriate measures which will give an opportunity to reduce the negative consequences of SARS and other pandemics.

 

REFERENCES

Clark, E. (2003) SARS Strikes down Asia Tourism. BBC News. May 15, 2003. Retrieved from:< http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/business/3024015.stm>

Experts Warn Against SARS’ Psychological Impact on Asian Economy. (2003) Peopledaily.com. May 14, 2003. Retrieved from:

Liu, J., Moss, S., Zhang, J. (2011) The Life Cycle of Pandemic Crisis: SARS Impact on Air Travel. Journal of International Business Research. July 1, 2011. Retrieved from:

Tasi, A. (2011) A Brief Overview of SARS and its Implications for the Future. Yahoo Voices. January 30, 2011. Retrieved from:< http://voices.yahoo.com/a-brief-overview-sars-its-implications-for-8692659.html>

The Economic Impact of SARS. (2003) CBC News. July 8, 2003. Retrieved from:

Tourism Industry. (2004) Asia Case Research Center. The University of Hong Kong. January 27, 2004. Retrieved from:< http://www.acrc.org.hk/sars/industry.asp?doc=tourism>

Viruses without Borders: International Aspects of SARS. (2011) Public Health Agency of Canada. Retrieved from:< http://www.phac-aspc.gc.ca/publicat/sars-sras/naylor/11-eng.php>