At first glance, all of the aforementioned antibiotics are effective and can stop the spread of various infections. However, practically all of them can have dangerous side-effects, especially if they are consumed on the regular basis. For instance, Amoxicillin is susceptible for degradation by b-lactamase-producing bacteria. As for Ciprofloxacin and Azithromycin, these antibiotics were alleged in false advertising and inadequate use because Azinthromycin, for instance, is presumed to be effective in the treatment of asthma, but there are no scientific evidences of its effectiveness, whereas Ciprofloxacin got several warning from the FDA regarding false advertising and failure to provide adequate warnings within their promotional materials.

Obviously, antibiotics are essential for the treatment of certain conditions but they are extremely dangerous for human health, especially if they are consumed without any regulations from the part of health care professionals and the authorities regulating the production of food and drugs, such as the FDA. At the same time, it is important to place emphasis on the fact that the consumption of antibiotics by humans is closely intertwined with the consumption of antibiotics by animals because the meat consumed by humans contains antibiotics and animals consuming antibiotics grow more and more resistant to antibiotics and so do humans consuming meat.

At this point, it is worth mentioning the fact that the conventional farming is the major threat to human health because it is the conventional farming, where animals are subject to antibiotics use. What is meant here is the fact that animals receive antibiotics, which are used to prevent the spread of epidemics and various illnesses among animals. At first glance, the use of antibiotics increases the safety of food, because people consuming meat of animals, which consumed antibiotics, will not face the risk of the contamination with an infection spread through the meat of ill animals. Antibiotics ensure that the meat will contain any infection or bacteria. In this regard, the meat manufactured by conventional farming is safe.

However, the pursuit of safety through the excessive use of antibiotics in the conventional farming has dangerous side-effects associated with the consumption of antibiotics. To put it more precisely, the use of antibiotics in farming leads to the accumulation of antibiotics in the meat and the growing resistance of bacteria to antibiotics. As a result, humans face the risk of increasing the resistance of bacteria to antibiotics and they have to consumer more new antibiotics to cope with health problems and conditions, which need the use of antibiotics.

In fact, the development of the organic meat production is closely intertwined with the development of organic farming because the emergence of organic farming paved the way to the totally new standards of the meat production, which were quite different from standards established in the industrial agriculture and meat production. In this respect, it is important to lay emphasis on the difference of organic meat from conventional meat produced within the industrial agriculture. In actuality, organic farming and organic meat are quite different from conventional ones in terms of technologies and products used in the process of feeding animals and their maintenance. To put it more precisely, the conventional farming admits the use of different elements, including antibiotics and hormones which can be potentially dangerous to human health. In addition, the organic meat production is constantly growing and potentially it can increase its share in the market compared to the conventional meat production. In this regard, it is possible to refer to table 1, which shows the production of organic meat in the USA.

The increase of the organic meat production is, to a significant extent, determined by the substantial difference of organic meat from conventional meat and technologies used in their production. At this point, it is important to stress the fact that conventional farming still admits the use of gelatin (rendered from the hooves of cattle and other species), fats, oil, grease and tallow (from cattle and other species), poultry and poultry by-products, rendered pork protein, rendered horse protein (Paull, 15). Potentially the use of these elements in feeding non-organic cattle can be dangerous to human health since they can provoke the deterioration of human health because of various diseases, allergy and other negative reactions of human body on the use of these elements. At the same time, neither of the aforementioned items is used in the organic farming that makes organic meat safe to human health. The main principle of the organic farming is the use of organic, natural elements which cattle can consume in the natural environment, while the use of artificial elements is totally banned.

In such a way, the major benefit of organic meat is the lack of dangerous elements or additives which can threaten to health of consumers. To put it more precisely, organic meat is free of antibiotics, added hormones, GMO feed and other drugs. Furthermore, animals are not used in the process of feeding of animals used in the production of organic meat.

However, the organic farming is underdeveloped today and many Americans still eat conventional meat instead of organic meat. Therefore, the risk of the negative impact of antibiotics on human health increases. To put it more precisely, the persistence of conventional farming leads to the further growth of the consumption of antibiotics by humans. The situation is aggravated by the uncontrolled consumption of antibiotics because often people consume antibiotics without consultations with their doctors. In such a situation, the consumption of meat of animals, which used antibiotics, increases the risk of negative effects of the consumption of antibiotics on human health.

Today, the authorities and health care professionals attempt to regulate the consumption of antibiotics by humans but the authorities fail to control the consumption of antibiotics by animals. Instead, regulating agencies focus on the safety of food, especially meat, that encourages farmers to use more antibiotics to ensure that their meat is infection-free. However, such policy leads to the increase of the consumption of antibiotics by humans because bacteria grow more and more resistant to antibiotics and humans cannot resist to them without the use of antibiotics and, what is more, they have to consume more and new antibiotics.

Thus, taking into account all above mentioned, it is important to place emphasis on the fact that the consumption of antibiotics by humans and animals is closely intertwined. In fact, antibiotics are used in the conventional farming to prevent the spread of infections and to increase safety of food but the use of antibiotics increases the resistance of bacteria to antibiotics and the meat consumed by humans leads to the increase of the risk of side-effects of antibiotics. In addition, humans are vulnerable to the impact of new, more dangerous bacteria which develop in response to the use of antibiotics in conventional farming. Therefore, the consumption of antibiotics by humans and animals should be thoroughly regulated, whereas the authorities should stimulate the development of organic farming to prevent the use of antibiotics by animals and decrease their consumption by humans.

Works Cited:

Griscom, Amanda. “Organic: friend or faux.” Gristmill Magazine, April, 2004.

Guthman, Julie. Agrarian Dreams: The Parodox of Organic Farming in California, Berkeley and London: University of California Press, 2004.

Klepper, R. “Economic performance and energy intensiveness on organic and conventional farms in the Corn Belt: a preliminary comparison.” American Journal of Agricultural Economics. Vol 59, No. 1. February, 1977.

Kuepper, George and Gegner, Lance. “Organic Crop Production Overview”, ATTRA – National Sustainable Agriculture Information Service. August 2004.

Lampkin and Padel. The Economics of Organic Farming: An International Perspective. Guildford: CAB International, 1994.

Lipson, M. Searching for o-word. Organic Farming Research Foundation. Santa Cruz, California, USA, 1997.

Oelhaf, R. Organic Agriculture: economic and ecological comparisons with conventional methods. Allanheld, Osman, Montclair, NJ, 1978.

Paull, John. “The Farm as Organism: The Foundational Idea of Organic Agriculture”. Journal of Bio-Dynamics Tasmania 83: 14-18, 2006.